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Read me please

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Steven Sesselmann

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Read me please

PostWed Jul 23, 2014 8:07 am

For the benefit of new and existing members, I would like to point out that the purpose of this forum is to discuss the idea of a redefined ground potential, and in doing so we are obliged to retain a level of healthy scepticism.

The true sceptics of this world (ie. Michael Shermer http://youtu.be/b_6-iVz1R0o), insist that any new theory of physics must be able to describe everything the standard model does and more. While this is correct in principle, it also put's an absolute block on the possibility of a new model, because no single person can rewrite 80 years of physics development.

We shall make no grand claims, but shall instead investigate how the concept of a Ground Potential at 930 million volts, fits in the physical world. To do this we need to tackle one problem at the time, and if that one passes, we move it to the solutions forum, and move on to the next.

If at some point the theory fails catastrophically we admit it's wrong and move on, as Richard Feynman said, science is about guessing, we make an educated guess, and test how well that guess fits with our observations, and if it doesnt, it's just wrong.

I said to myself, what if electrons and protons are pairs (it was a guess), I then tried to justify the mass difference, and thought the electron might have suffered a mass defect like nuclei do (another guess), then I tried to find the equation to relate the electron to the proton (yet another guess), the solution indicated a ground potential of some 930 million volts. I looked around and realised that the table of nuclear binding energies peak at Ni62 which is almost excactly 930 million volts.

Suddenly a few more pieces of the puzzle started to fit together, and that's where we are today..

I think it's a pretty neat idea, but make no grandiose claims, like every other successful theory it needs to undergo rigerous testing, and I welcome that.

It's like a 1000 piece puzzle, with a missing box and lid, the more hands we have the quicker we can complete the task.

Lets try and complete the puzzle, maybe it turns out to be a really pretty picture.

Steven
Steven Sesselmann
Only a person mad enough to think he can change the world, can actually do it...

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