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Antimatter

PostPosted: Tue Dec 26, 2017 4:56 pm
by Brendan Bogan
Merry Christmas!

As I was out for my morning run today, I had a thought.

If GPT is reality, then what does that mean for antimatter? What is the absolute surface potential of an anti-proton? a positron?

If the Coulomb force does not exist, why does particle-antiparticle annihilation happen?

Cheers!

Re: Antimatter

PostPosted: Wed Dec 27, 2017 8:56 pm
by Steven Sesselmann
Brendan Bogan wrote:Merry Christmas!, As I was out for my morning run today, I had a thought.

Merry Christmas to you too, running is a good way to think, I usually go swimming which if it was not for my thinking, would in reality be pretty boring.

Brendan Bogan wrote:If GPT is reality, then what does that mean for antimatter?

No one knows what reality is, I think all we can do is explain the world in the simplest possible terms, preferably so a child can understand it. Instead it seems understanding the world has become the domain of "Rocket Scientists" which in turn gets dumbed down by popular science communicators like Neill DeGrasse Tyson and Michiu Kaku, these guys aren't teaching science, they are just sugaring their own cake by spreading beliefs.

Good question you ask about antimatter, according to GPT matter is simply a wave with an offset baseline right, so we can think of hydrogen as a standing wave, oscillating between 0.511 and 938 MV, where the point of inflection (baseline) is at ground potential.

Now understand the observers role here, because the point of inflection is not an intrinsic property of the wave, the wave just always appears to cross over at the observers potential. This is a bit like looking at a rainbow, no matter how hard you try you can't run under a rainbow, because it always appears at a certain angle to the observer.

So as the observers potential changes, so does the point of inflection, and taken to the extreme, when the observers potential falls to 469 MV all matter waves in the universe become symmetrical, which means they become photons.

When the same universe is observed from a potential lower than 469 MV, it is the anti-world so nuclei would be negative and electrons would be positive.

Brendan Bogan wrote:What is the absolute surface potential of an anti-proton? a positron?


The simple answer is the same surface potential as their anti particle, the only difference is what we have incorrectly called charge, the proper term should have been "direction" , let me explain.

Physicists often refer to "speed" as opposed to "velocity" but when it comes to bodies of mass, velocity is the only valid term, and such velocity can only be positive or negative with respect to the observer. It can sometimes be difficult to determine if something is moving backwards or forwards, take for example the moon in orbit around the earth, does it move backwards or forwards?

Well contra to popular belief it actually moves backwards, away from the observer in an ever increasing spiral (the increasing radius has been measured by NASA). The good news is, it's not going to fall down :).

So with all that stuff going on around us, how do we know what's moving towards us and what's moving away from us?

Well GPT tells us...

\[\Delta v = c(\frac{\Delta V}{\Phi})\]

Where the difference in potential is
\[\Delta V = V_g - V_s\]

So when you plug numbers into that trivial equation above you will see that any body which has a lower surface potential than the observer will have a positive velocity vector and any body with higher surface potential than the observer has a negative velocity vector.

Put simply stuff that moves away from us is positive and stuff that moves towards us is negative.

Charge is just a direction, that's all it is, and that explains why there are no fractional charges.

This is also why I now know that ground potential is falling, because we are sandwiched between positive and negative stuff.

Brendan Bogan wrote:If the Coulomb force does not exist, why does particle-antiparticle annihilation happen?


I may need to swim a few laps before I can come up with a good answer to your last question ;)


Steven