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Space is Big

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Steven Sesselmann

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Space is Big

PostThu Dec 18, 2014 1:40 pm

New Scientist wrote:Space is big, wrote Douglas Adams in The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy. "Really big. You just won't believe how vastly hugely mindbogglingly big it is." Too right: the edge of the observable universe is some 46 billion light years away. Within that volume there are anything between 100 and 200 billion galaxies, each containing hundreds of billions of stars.

If that weren't mind-blowing enough, according to the big bang theory – our best stab at explaining how it all came to be – everything exploded into being from nowhere, about 13.8 billion years ago. An infinitesimal pinprick of unimaginable heat and density has slowly stretched and cooled into the cosmos we know today.


This is one of the areas where in my opinion the Big Bang model fails completely. Physics is about finding the underlying rules that govern our world, and not about inventing a world that fits our model. Coming up with a scenario where the entire Universe appears from nothing, then goes through an inflationary phase before suddenly materializing as a Universe, would literally have to be the biggest nonsense story ever told.

GP theory explains the beginning of time in a very different way.

We believe an observers potential falls over time, and as the observers potential falls GP theory tells us that the potential of the electrons Increase, this is to be understood as all electrons in the Universe, not just those electons that form part of the observers body. This is because an observers potential is directly linked to its position on the time line.

The convergence of the electron potential and the observer potential ends when the electron potential matches the observer potential, at excactly 469 MV potential (half proton potential).

This critical point 469 MV is equivalent to the Schwartzchild radius, and I believe an observer at this point will have reached the end of time. Universal annihilation between every proton and electron will appear to take place, and obviously produce a nice Big Bang.

However, we must understand that this big bang is not a single event, but a continuous event, and as we sit here and enjoy our potential of some 930 MV, bodies elsewhere in our Universe are undergoing annihilation right now, they are simply further advanced in time than what we currently are.

I speculate that the complete annihilation of protons and an electrons, generate diametrically ejected photons of exactly 469 MV each, one travelling backwards in time and the other travelling forwards in time, each particle on it's own becoming a new 938 MV body at the beginning of time, i.e.. a brand new proton at the beginning of time in a brand new Universe.

When I calculate the kinetic energy of a proton, it becomes clear that there is no way this proton could have travelled very far, in fact the velocity of a proton as seen from current ground potential, gives it only enough energy to just escape our galaxy. For this reason I suspect that the matter in a galaxy is simply recycled, and that each galaxy is more or less a stand alone world. New protons continuously appearing at the edges of the galaxy, and old protons annihilating at the centre, thereby ensuring continuous creation and annihilation.

...where of course the electrons (the photons which dissapeared into the future) form an identical anti galaxy in the same way and in the same place.

Bang on!

Steven
Steven Sesselmann
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FourLeaves

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Re: Space is Big

PostWed Jan 14, 2015 7:51 pm

Does GP suggest that the position of continually occurring "Big Bangs" at 496 mV remains constant, relative to the position of all other conceivable points within the observable universe? Or are these 'Bangs occurring at the SR Radius of all black holes?
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Steven Sesselmann

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Re: Space is Big

PostWed Jan 14, 2015 9:25 pm

FourLeaves wrote:Does GP suggest that the position of continually occurring "Big Bangs" at 496 mV remains constant, relative to the position of all other conceivable points within the observable universe? Or are these 'Bangs occurring at the SR Radius of all black holes?


Interesting question...

There are a couple of if's to establish first. If the mass of all protons are uniform throughout the Universe, and not just a feature of our galaxy, then GP says that the SR radius must be at half the proton potential ie. 496 MV.

That being the case, it appears likely that most galaxies have a black hole center which continuously sucks in matter, at least when observed from our potential. It is also likely that most galaxies including the milky way have polar jets and we are unable to see them because the jets exit the galaxy in the time dimension i.e. perpendicular to space.

But to take this literally and say that the big bang is happening in more than one place is also not correct, because space, just like time is a function of potential, so we need to predict what happens to space as potential falls.

From GP theory we predict that potential is falling, this corresponds to a Universe which appears to be expanding, so it seems reasonable that a further fall in potential means a colder more diffuse Universe. Then at some point the proton and the electron are at the same potential but are now travelling so fast relative to the rest of the matter in the galaxy, that they undergo a relativistic axis shift and exit the galaxy along the time axis, the proton moving backwards in time, and the electron moving forwards in time.

If my calculations are correct, 496 MeV of kinetic energy should be just enough for the particles to reach a radius equal to the the rim of our galaxy, certainly not enough to reach the edge of the visible Universe.

Pure speculation only, but I suspect matter falling into the galactic black hole may tunnel through time and reappear as fresh new protons and electrons at the rim of the galaxy.

Looking back in time, it seems plausible that the annihilation and diametric ejection phase would appear much like the inflationary period that the current big bang model predicts.

While speculating on these matters we must always be aware that space is subject to potential, therefore a newly born proton exists in a hot universe where all matter is very close together, and as potential falls, space expands and cools.

We measure the diameter of the hydrogen atom to be 53 picometers on the outside, yet the distance between the proton and the electron on the inside is the diameter of the galaxy.

Steven
Steven Sesselmann
Only a person mad enough to think he can change the world, can actually do it...

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